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Three independent publishers. Three landmark anniversaries in 2017.

Guest blog by Matthew Adams, Between the Lines Publicist

In 2017 three Canadian publishers and Congress 2017 exhibitors — University of Manitoba Press, Between the Lines and Fernwood Publishing — will celebrate big anniversaries.  See below for more information about the party!

Founded in 1967, the University of Manitoba Press (UMP) is a leading publisher of books on Indigenous studies and Canadian history. UMP produces books that combine important scholarship with a deep engagement in issues and events that affect our lives, including immigration studies, ethnic studies, the study of Canadian literature, culture, politics, Indigenous languages and a wide-ranging list of books on the heritage of the peoples and land of the Canadian prairies. UMP books have been recognized for their excellence with dozens of prestigious awards.

In 1977, a small group of activists founded...

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Big Picture at #congressh: The Next 150 on Indigenous Lands

Guest blog by Karen Leiva, Congress 2017 blogger

The Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences brings together leading thinkers, academics, researchers, policy-makers and innovators to explore some of the world’s most challenging issues. Congress celebrates the vitality and quality of Canadian research contributions, and helps train the next generation of Canadian ideas leadership. This year’s theme “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands" celebrates the history, legacy and achievements of the peoples and territories that make us who we are, and anticipates the boundless opportunities of the future. Organized by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, this year’s Congress is being hosted by Ryerson University in Toronto from May 27-June 2. Follow this series of Big Picture at #congressh blogs.

With the overarching theme of Congress 2017 being “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands,” expect to find programming that...

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Big Picture at #congressh: Ready for Congress

Gabriel Miller, Executive Director, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences brings together leading thinkers, academics, researchers, policy-makers and innovators to explore some of the world’s most challenging issues. Congress celebrates the vitality and quality of Canadian research contributions, and helps train the next generation of Canadian ideas leadership. This year’s theme “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands" celebrates the history, legacy and achievements of the peoples and territories that make us who we are, and anticipates the boundless opportunities of the future. Organized by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, this year’s Congress is being hosted by Ryerson University in Toronto from May 27-June 2. Follow this series of Big Picture at #congressh blogs.

Get ready for Congress 2017!

Congress! This year’s will be my...

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Nunavut Arctic College Media Joins ACUP - Introducing Too Many People - Digital Archive Repatriation Project – Hunter Education Films

Guest blog by Sean Guistini

Nunavut Arctic College Media (NAC Media) is the newest member of the Association of Canadian University Presses (ACUP). NAC Media is the first scholarly press in Canada’s territories. Please visit our site to view our books and films, and download our 2017 catalogue. www.nacmedia.ca 

Too Many People
NAC Media is excited to announce the release of our newest book – Willem Rasing’s Too Many People: Contact, Disorder, Change in an Inuit Society, 1822-2015. This is a sweeping and rigorous socio-historical examination of the contact between the outside world and a group of Inuit, the Iglulingmiut, living in Canada’s Eastern Arctic. The nature of these encounters...

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Research into Asia-Pacific truth commission shows truth and reconciliation as ongoing, activist processes

Guest blog by David Webster, Bishop’s University, @dwebsterbu

Does a truth and reconciliation process end when a truth commission hands in its final report? The experience of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s (TRC) brutal residential schools system implies that it definitely should not. The TRC’s calls to action call on settler society to do some of the heavy lifting necessary for true reconciliation.

A new research project into truth and reconciliation processes in Southeast Asia and Melanesia draws similar conclusions. We need to understand truth and reconciliation as processes – starting with a pre-TRC phase in which individuals and groups begin to call for truth-telling about a violent past,  and continuing with a post-TRC phase in...

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